Welcome to the classrom lesson plans section. This section offers you a series of lesson plans and supporting slides to enable you to include the trans experience through a variety of lesson plans in all key stages.

 

The Gender Question

Age: KS3

This lesson gives background information about trans and non-binary issues and some explicit information about sex differentiation. It explains in broad terms, the role of the brain, and how this is not always congruent with the sex appearance.

Most schools are subject to the Public Sector Equality Duty, and all are required to abide by the Equality Act 2010. Understanding gender diversity starts in school. In law, gender diversity is as important as race and ethnicity diversity. Religion, belief, or cultural norms may not be used to discriminate against those who are gender non-conforming. As children reach puberty, more of those who experience gender incongruence will be seeking physiological intervention, although this is not necessary for all trans and non-binary young people. Roughly 1% of the population is gender variant to some degree, so schools must be prepared to support these young people if they choose to transition.

All the lesson materials (lesson plan, PowerPoint slideshow and worksheets) are included below as a link. Download to your machine then double-click on the blue disc icon. Then click the ‘extract’ button. A new directory will be created called Schools Out Lesson Plans.

All Lesson Materials are available below:

 

Detailed Lesson Plan for 'The Gender Question' (Microsoft Word Format)

'The Gender Question' Lesson Slides (Microsoft Powerpoint)

 

The Penguin Stories

Lesson Plan: Gender diversity for primary school children

Age: Suggested age range 3-6.

Lesson Details: ‘Penguin land’ stories (Gender Identity Research & Education Society)

3 short stories, each take 2-3 minutes to read to the class.   The stories start in the same way, but each ends differently:

•    Sally’s story is about a penguin child whose gender identity as a girl, was not immediately understood by her family, they thought she was a boy;
•    Tom’s story is the same, but in reverse, the family thought he was a girl;
•    Blur’s story is about an identity that is neither boy nor girl (non-binary, gender queer)

Lesson Context:  Most schools are subject to the Public Sector Equality Duty, and all are required to abide by the Equality Act 2010. Understanding gender diversity starts here, at primary school level, before children’s views become influenced by the prejudices of the adults around them. In law, gender diversity is as important as race and ethnicity diversity. Religion, belief, or cultural norms may not be used to discriminate against those who are gender non-conforming.

All Lesson Materials are available to download by clicking on the links below:

 

Detailed Lesson Plan for the Penguin Stories (Microsoft Word format)

Penguin Story - trans boy Lession Slides (Microsoft Powerpoint)

Penguin Story - trans girl Lesson Slides (Microsoft Powerpoint)

Penguin Story - non-binary Lesson Slides (Microsoft Powerpoint)

 

Peter's Story

Lesson Plan: Gender diversity for school children

Age:  7-11 (suggested age, but teachers should use their own judgement about the readiness of children for this story)

Lesson Details:

Peter’s Story: The core of the story is the famous ‘Owl and the Pussy-Cat’ poem which, in order to avoid linguistic associations that were not applicable in Edward Lear’s day, has been changed to the Owl and the Kitty-cat. The subtext is that Peter, the central character, has a parent who has transitioned to live as a woman.  His teacher’s response is a key feature. The story takes less than 10 minutes to read.

Context:  Most schools are subject to the Public Sector Equality Duty, and all are required to abide by the Equality Act 2010. Understanding gender diversity starts when children are school age, before their views become influenced by the prejudices of the adults around them. In law, gender diversity is as important as race and ethnicity diversity. Religion, belief, or cultural norms may not be used to discriminate against those who are gender non-conforming. Other protected characteristics are touched on in Peter’s story: sexual orientation, disability; and race.

All Lesson Materials are available below:

 

Detailed Lesson Plan for Peter's Story (Microsoft Word format)

Peter's Story Lesson Slides (Microsoft Powerpoint)